Quick Answer: Can An Undetectable Person Donate Blood?

Can an undetectable person test negative?

You will still test positive for HIV if you are undetectable.

HIV tests usually detect antibodies, which are part of your immune system’s response to HIV.

People living with HIV who are undetectable still have antibodies to HIV which means you will test positive for HIV even if you have an undetectable viral load..

Can I test negative if my viral load is undetectable?

The bottom line is that if you’re living with HIV and have an undetectable viral load, you will still test positive for HIV if you get tested. But, this is expected, and doesn’t mean that your treatment is not working or that you aren’t undetectable.

Do you have to tell someone you are undetectable?

If I have an undetectable viral load or use a condom, do I still need to disclose my status to sexual partners? In most states with an HIV-specific criminal law, your viral load is not a factor in whether you must disclose your HIV-positive status; a few states, however, do take condom use into account.

How long can you stay undetectable?

A person’s viral load is considered “durably undetectable” when all viral load test results are undetectable for at least six months after their first undetectable test result. This means that most people will need to be on treatment for 7 to 12 months to have a durably undetectable viral load.

Can I infect my partner with an undetectable viral load?

Having an undetectable viral load does mean that there is not enough HIV in your body fluids to pass HIV on during sex. In other words, you are not infectious. For as long as your viral load stays undetectable, your chance of passing on HIV to a sexual partner is zero.

Does undetectable mean Untransmittable?

“U=U” is an easy way to remember that undetectable is untransmittable. That means if you are a person living with HIV and your viral load is undetectable, that there is no risk of transmitting HIV to someone who is HIV negative.

What is the lowest viral load?

The results of a viral load test are described as the number of copies of HIV RNA in a millilitre of blood. But your doctor will normally just talk about your viral load as a number. For example, a viral load of 10,000 would be considered low; 100,000 would be considered high.